Avada Interior Design
  • This brand makes carry-wear out of cactus leather, as it aims to create goods without causing any harm. It uses mostly eco-friendly materials and it limits the amount of chemicals and water used. Manufacturing location is not disclosed and the brand does not ensure that living wages are paid along its supply chain. It is PETA-certified vegan, ensuring no animals are harmed in the production of the brand’s bags.
  • Pieces by Azaki are designed to become a much worn and loved part of your wardrobe, and the brand’s website discourages the throwaway 'fast fashion' culture. It notes that it’s on a sustainability journey, always opting for natural fabrics such as linen, silk and cotton. They have a made-to-order system to reduce waste and Akazi also produce a very small run of garments in a small-scale production house in Indonesia. While they claim to have a close relationship with the production house, there is no evidence it ensures living wage in its supply chain. It’s important to mention that silk has a worse impact on the environment than any other textile, using more water than cotton and emitting more gases. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information about social, environmental and economic impact to give the brand a higher rating.
  • Alias Mae creates shoes that look to be well-made. The brand is partnered with i=Change to donate $1 from every sale to a few causes. This brand uses leather in most, if not all of its shoes. Nothing is in place to ensure responsible consumption and sustainable production. No information is given about packaging. The website does not list supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, manufacturing, social, environmental and economic impact.
  • Garments by Alice McCall look to be well-constructed pieces. It's website does not disclose where production takes place and the brand is not taking adequate steps to ensure payment of a living wage for its workers. Nothing is in place to ensure responsible consumption and sustainable production and no information is given about packaging. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, manufacturing, social, environmental and economic impact.
  • Garments by All About Eve look to be well made, however the brand does not list sufficient supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, gold/silver manufacturing or production and the social, environmental and economic impacts to give the brand a higher rating.
  • This brand encourages responsible consumption and claims that its workers are treated fairly. They use recycled components where possible and all packaging is biodegradable. In saying this, Alpha Fortis's website does not disclose where production takes place and is not taking adequate steps to ensure payment of a living wage for its workers. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, manufacturing, social, environmental and economic impact.
  • No About Us information, only a shop front, up to 80% cotton, no provenance on manufacturing country/location, no provenance on cotton textile, printed, no information on print materials/processes used. Failed transparency
  • Does not list supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, manufacturing, social, environmental and economic impact.
  • Amuse Society's website does not disclose where production takes place and is not taking adequate steps to ensure payment of a living wage for its workers. Nothing is in place to ensure responsible consumption and sustainable production and no information is given about packaging. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information; origin of textile fabric, textile production, manufacturing, social, environmental and economic impact.
  • This sustainably-driven surfwear brand makes board shorts from 100% recycled polyester, it uses some organic cotton in its products and is a part of the ‘Better Cotton Initiative’. The brand has removed plastic from its supply chain. Its manufacturers are based in China and Bangladesh and are part of the Child Labor Free initiative. The brand has a code of conduct for workers but there is no evidence it ensures living wage in its supply chain. Organic cotton, even though it’s a good option, requires high water consumption to grow. More efforts need to be made by And or With to counteract the brand’s negative social, economical and environmental impacts.
  • This brand is lacking transparency around its supply chain and policies and does not express any sustainability goals. It does not communicate where its products are manufactured, or whether or not it is taking adequate steps to ensure payment of a living wage and fair working conditions for workers along its supply chain. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information to give it a higher rating; origin of materials and textile fabric, textile and material production, manufacturing location, or the social, environmental and economic impacts.
  • This brand is partnered with Pledge 1%, a global movement that donates 1% of their staff time, product, profit, and/or equity to any charity of the brand's choice. Apero donates to Women’s Community Shelter. Customers can choose to offset their carbon at checkout, and all packaging is sustainable. They manufacture out of the Guangzhou Province of China and all factories are certified by Sedex, an ethical trade membership organisation, working with businesses to improve working conditions in global supply chains. In saying this, there is no evidence it ensures living wage in its supply chain. The website does not list sufficient supply chain information about social, environmental and economic impact to give the brand a higher rating.

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